The Outdoorsmans Guide To Forever Free

The Outdoorsmans Guide To Forever Free

Review: Work Sharp Pocket Knife Sharpener

I recently reviewed an electric knife & tool sharpener from Work Sharp Tools, and while it works well — after all, it’s essentially a small belt sander/grinder — it can’t go everywhere you go. Sometimes, we need a way to touch up our knives right now, wherever we are. Well, Work Sharp has that covered too.

I’ve had a Work Sharp Pocket Knife Sharpener since last spring, and although I did most of my sharpening during that time with the power sharpener, I’ve kept the manual sharpener handy as well.

Features of the Work Sharp Pocket Knife Sharpener (Photo © Work Sharp)

Features of the Work Sharp Pocket Knife Sharpener
(Photo © Work Sharp)

This sharpener is not the smallest one ever, but it’s a good size. It measures 6-1/8″ at the longest point, and each sharpening surface is 4″ long. As for weight, mine tips the scales at a mere 1.65 ounces!

User Guide for the Work Sharp Pocket Knife Sharpener

User Guide for the Work Sharp Pocket Knife Sharpener

It’s thoughtfully-designed, with angle guides at both ends of both surfaces and an easy-to-grip shape. The yellow part is not hard plastic — it feels a tad rubbery, but really tough — so if you accidentally run your knife edge into the angle guide, you’re not hurting the edge.

It's not the smallest pocket sharpener. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

It’s not the smallest pocket sharpener.
(Photo © Russ Chastain)

There’s a hole at each end, so you can hang it up above your workbench or add a lanyard if you wish. Heck, hang it around your neck like Eli Wallach did with his six-gun in The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly if you want to.

This is my current EDC "user and abuser" knife. The sharpener sweetens it up quickly. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

This is my current EDC “user and abuser” knife. The sharpener sweetens it up quickly.
(Photo © Russ Chastain)

As with the power sharpener, my first impression was that the difference between the coarse and fine was pretty extreme, and maybe not ideal… but once again, it works like a champ. The diamond surface is pretty aggressive, which probably means this thing will last a long time — because there’s a long way for it to wear. The ceramic rod is not the finest ceramic I’ve seen, but it’s much finer than the diamond.

The diamond side is pretty aggressive and makes fast work of sharpening everyday knives. Touch up on ceramic rod for a finer edge. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

The diamond side is pretty aggressive and makes fast work of sharpening everyday knives. Touch up on ceramic rod for a finer edge.
(Photo © Russ Chastain)

The grittiness of the diamond surface means it should also be useful for sharpening other cutting tools as well.

I have large hands, and it's a stretch for me to hold it between thumb and forefinger; I prefer the grip shown on the right. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

I have large hands, and it’s a stretch for me to hold it between thumb and forefinger; I prefer the grip shown on the right.
(Photo © Russ Chastain)

Even when my EDC knockaround knife was dull enough to see glinting on the edge, a few licks on the diamond followed by a few more on the ceramic had it shaving-sharp in no time. The ceramic rod should also be useful for touching up gut hooks on hunting knives.

As you can tell, so far I have no complaints — this is a good thing, because I’ve been called a harsh critic. That, I suppose, is why I look at this sharpener and wish there was a way to rotate the ceramic rod to expose a fresh surface after it’s been used a while. At first glance, it appeared as if the ceramic was molded into the plastic. Alas!

Some folks say you can't rotate the ceramic rod... but heck, you can take it all the way out if you want.  (Photo © Russ Chastain)

Some folks say you can’t rotate the ceramic rod… but heck, you can take it all the way out if you want.
(Photo © Russ Chastain)

But wait! Turns out, the white rod is not molded in — in fact, it can even be popped out of the plastic holder! This should allow it to be used on any number of curved edges, from gut hooks to (shudder) serrated blades. And of course, you can rotate it into any position, so you can get the most use out of it before it’s worn out.

All I did was grab the ceramic with needlenose pliers and pull gently, and it came right out. Squeeze it back into place and the plastic holds it securely.

Ah me… a product review for something I can’t find anything wrong with. Will wonders never cease?

You can pick up your very own Work Sharp Pocket Knife Sharpener for $14.99 shipped.

The post Review: Work Sharp Pocket Knife Sharpener appeared first on AllOutdoor.com.

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